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    Science of Safety Podcast: Episode 90.

    November 26, 2020
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    Science of Safety Podcast.

    Episode 90:
    Conducting a respirator fit test - Part 2.

    Science of Safety Podcast.

    Episode 90:
    Conducting a respirator fit test - Part 2.

    Science of Safety Podcast.

    Episode 90:
    Conducting a respirator fit test - Part 2.

    In this episode, host Mark Reggers and guest Mike Clayton, 3M’s Senior Respiratory Protection Research & Application Specialist for the Personal Safety Division in the United Kingdom continue where they left off and resume their discussion on the subject matter of conducting a respirator fit test.

    Tight-fitting respirators must seal to the wearer’s face to provide the expected protection. A respiratory fit test ensures that the respirator truly fits and is being worn correctly. Respiratory fit testing applies to all tight-fitting respirators, either full face masks that cover the mouth, nose and eyes and half masks which covers the mouth and nose.

      

             

        

    Guest Bio:

    Mike Clayton (pictured left) is a PPE/RPE subject matter expert at 3M UK supporting customers with the selection and implementation of personal safety solutions across the EMEA region. Mike has over 30 years of experience in health and safety with the focus on respiratory protective equipment (RPE) performance application, selection and use, performance measurement, testing, incident investigations and standards development.

    Mike holds the position of Lead Assessor and Lead Technical Advisor on the UK’s respiratory fit testing competence scheme’s (Fit2Fit). He chairs the British Safety Industry Federation’s (BSIF) Respiratory Protection Group and is a member of the British Standards Respiratory Protection Committee, provides RPE expertise to the development of British, European and International standards.

    Before joining 3M, Mike was the PPE Technical Team Lead at the UK’s Health & Safety Executive’s scientific laboratory and was responsible for a portfolio of research and support activities in support of HSE regulatory duties. Mike was the lead author of the HSE respiratory fit test guidance and has provided training in fit testing to many sectors of industry, including healthcare. Mike previously served as president of the International Society for Respiratory Protection (ISRP) 2014-2016.

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    In this episode, Mark & Mike discuss the following:

     
    • What is the correct procedure for conducting a taste threshold Qualitative fit test (QLFT)?
    • What happens if a wearer cant taste the sensitivity solution?
    • What happens if the wearer tastes the test solution during the test?
    • What are the common pitfalls or mistakes you commonly see with QLFT?
    • Does the wearer sit or stand during a fit test?
    • Can you talk us through the correct procedure of conducting a QNFT – APC?
    • What happens if there are not enough ambient particles during a test?
    • What are the common pitfalls or mistakes you commonly see with QNFT – APC?
    • Can you talk us through the correct procedure of conducting a CNP test?
    • What are the common pitfalls or mistakes you commonly see with CNP tests?
    • Can the wearer adjust the fit during a fit test?
    • How many times can a person be fit tested on the same mask before trying a different one?
    • Who can conduct a fit test?
    • What takeaway point would you want to leave with our listeners?
    • Where can the listeners go and get further information about respiratory fit testings?
    • How can our listeners get in contact with yourself?

    Respiratory protective equipment needs to fit well so they can perform as intended. When fitted and worn correctly, the air comes through the mask when the wearer inhales and not through gaps around the face seal. If there are gaps in the face seal the air will not go through the filter, it will take the path of least resistance and leak through the face seal, allowing the inhalation of contaminated air. With health statistics indicating that there are still a lot of people becoming ill from exposure to workplace respiratory hazards, fit testing constitutes a critical element in any respiratory protection programme. Tune in as we look at respirator fit testing, the different methodologies appropriate for your application and why it is essential in ensuring that the selected respirator is keeping you safe.

     

    Additional Resources:

    Contact a 3M Safety Specialist at scienceofsafetyanz@mmm.com for more information.